November 26, 2014, 10:18:37 AM
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
« Dvorak's CAGE MATCHThe Tech SectionTech News / Commentary • : Power grid test may affect some clocks »
ThreadTools

Print


 (Read 1444 times) [1]

  Power grid test may affect some clocks
« on: June 25, 2011, 05:21:50 AM » by John E. Quantum
The North American power grid runs at 60 Hz and the power companies traditionally have gone to great lengths to insure that the system stays at precisely 60 Hz. Many clocks and other devices use the 60 Hz frequency as the basis for maintaining accurate timekeeping functions, although in todays world, other more accurate time keeping strategies are used in electronic devices. The North American Electric Reliability Corp. is considering a test in which the frequency will be allowed to float in an effort to improve the reliability of the overall grid-

"A June 14 company presentation spelled out the potential effects of the change: East Coast clocks may run as much as 20 minutes fast over a year, but West Coast clocks are only likely to be off by 8 minutes. In Texas, it's only an expected speedup of 2 minutes.

Some parts of the grid, like in the East, tend to run faster than others. Errors add up. If the grid averages just over 60 cycles a second, clocks that rely on the grid will gain 14 seconds per day, according to the company's presentation."

http://tinyurl.com/6gfgv58


Maybe a good excuse for being late to work?
Logged

  Re: Power grid test may affect some clocks
« Reply #1 on: June 26, 2011, 06:14:56 PM » by Obtuser
 I have heard about Ont. Hydro running a lower voltage test to check out their system, but not a delta Hertz test. That lower voltage test was usually run on a Sunday morning when the grid was the least stressed and not during the mid Summer or mid Winter either!
 You made the statement that:  quote "The North American power grid runs at 60 Hz and the power companies traditionally have gone to great lengths to insure that the system stays at precisely 60 Hz." If I recall correctly, that was not always the case in the early days of electrical generation, but later on they standardized in throughout North America, excluding Mexico where they are at 127 Volts not 120 V. This link has a chart of World Power Specs.:
http://www.kropla.com/electric2.htm

Logged

What are you worrying for? You are not getting out of this life alive, dead don't hurt, getting there might, and in some cases, damn well should!
 Plus during and after the next Ice Age, all of this infrastructure around us won't matter squat!

 (Read 1444 times) [1]
Jump to:  
UserTools

Home
Help
Search
Members List
Statistics
Login
Register



LatestNews

Read Dvorak Uncensored

Check the Tech Section for the Tech5,
Cranky Geeks and
No Agenda Webcasts.


About Us

Clear Sky Clock


ForumStats

45256 Posts
8709 Topics
1109 Members
Latest Member: Niestek

Powered by PHP
Powered by MySQL
Valid XHTML 1.0!
Valid CSS!



Powered by SMF 2.0.1 | SMF © 2001-2005, Lewis Media
Simplicity design by Bloc